Zac-Oct. 4Why are you Wearing that??

Here’s something to think about… Our hospital is the one building in our community where patients with every type of virus and bacteria come to get help. Regardless of how the illness is transmitted, people in need come to our hospital and we are committed to providing care to all members of our community.

You may be hospitalized for an injury in a car accident, but your roommate on the right could be a surgical patient infected with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and your roommate on the left could be smack dab in the middle of a serious bout with the flu.

Another patient may have come down with a nasty bout of Clostridium difficile (C. Diff). There may be a pediatric patient with a high fever and Escherichia coli (e. coli) in his urine, an elderly gentlemen with an upper respiratory infection, a young immunocomprised patient with neutropenic fever, or a suspected Tuberculosis patient, all being cared for on the same unit by the same doctors and nurses.

The point is, any of these patients presents additional risks to the patients around them, but they all deserve the same safe amazing care. That’s why here at WVMC we make isolation precautions a priority to protect you and your family.

The outfits you see my coworker and I wearing contain various pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE). The signs we are holding provide simple yet detailed information on the safest way to care for and visit with patients on some type of isolation precautions. When you come to our hospital as a patient or visitor, you will most likely see some patients rooms’ with these signs and healthcare providers dressing in various pieces of PPE when entering a room.

Don’t let that scare you or make you feel uncomfortable. Let that make you feel safe and protected because we are doing everything possible to prevent the transmission of illness in a building full of sick patients. Dawning proper PPE and performing safe hand hygiene are strategies we employ here at WVMC to help reduce the transmission of illness, and they work.

Sometimes family and friends come to visit a hospitalized loved one and they don’t understand why we all need to wear the gloves, or the mask, or the gown. We are committed to providing education to patients and their visitors, and we are happy to answer any questions you might have about how these strategies help protect you.

So perhaps rather than calling them isolation precautions (which makes it sound like we are singling a patient out), we can think about them as “protective” precautions. Rest assured, we are going to do everything we can, 24-7-365, to protect you and your family with the safest possible care.

For more information regarding PPE and preventing the spread of healthcare-associated infections, visit the CDC Website